THE BRADDOWS OF DERBYSHIRE

When I was researching my wife's great great grandparents WILLIAM and ELLEN OTTER, I applied for a copy of their marriage certificate. When it arrived it stated that they were married in the Parish Church in Kirkby in Ashfield at July 12th 1858, William was a 21 year old  Bachelor, and Ellen a 19 year old spinster. Both were living in Kirkby, at the time of the marriage, with William's occupation given as labourer. Ellen's maiden name and the surname of her father was a problem but after a little thought and investigation, I discovered that ELLEN's maiden name was BRADDOW, - the writing of the person who filled in the certificate was difficult to read. The dates of birth are out by a year or two compared with the 1881 Census but that is not unusual

ELLEN BRADDOW,  was the daughter of JERIMIAH BRADDOW, a collier by occupation

A check on the IGI Index revealed that JERIMIAH BRADDOW was christened in Pinxton Derbyshire on either the 8 or 26 OCTOBER 1817 and that he was the son of CHARLES and ELIZABETH BRADDOW. JERIMIAH had an elder brother CHARLES who was christened on 26 OCT 1815   in Pinxton. the other information I have is that ELIZABETH may be the person who is in the Pinxston Burial registers for 1831

"18 Sep 1831 Elizabeth BRADDOW Pinxton Green p.Kirkby in Ashfield 46"

JERIMIAH married a CATHERINE LEE (born abt 1821 in Pinxton, Derbyshire in Mansfield Nottinghamshire England in 1838 and had two children that I knew about ELLEN (b1840) and JERIMIAH (born 1847 - died 1852 and buried in Pinxton Churchyard 7 April 1852). But when I checked the christenings for Pinxton I found that on Xmas Day 25 December 1843 Jerimiah and Catherine had three daughters christened ELLEN, RACHEL and ANN all at once.

Catherine is believed to have died in 1851 

NOTE

In the Derbyshire Times dated 14 June 2007 there is an article written by David Hopkinson under the title

Revamp riddle of church relics
14 June 2007
By David Hopkinson
Gravestones dating back hundreds of years have been discovered under carpeting in an ancient parish church leaving members scratching their heads.
The gravestones are thought to have been taken from the churchyard for use as flagstones in the floor of St Helen's Church at Pinxton.

But when they were moved remains a mystery.

Churchwarden Stuart Thornley said that the headstones came to light when the carpeting was being replaced.

"It was something of a shock to see them. The carpet had been down for many years and we had no idea that they were there," he said.

"They had obviously been taken from the churchyard and used when the floor was relaid. But we have no idea when the work was done."

When the headstones were discovered, puzzled churchgoers found the crudely-carved inscriptions almost impossible to read until flour was brushed over the lettering to make the words stand out.

One stone, directly in front of the altar, relates to the death of a 32-year-old woman, Mary Kelsal. The gravestone says that she was buried on March 12, 1674.

Another refers to 34-year-old Ann, wife of Samuel Coup, who "departed this life" in 1795.

New carpeting has now been laid on the church floor and the headstones have been covered again.

St Helen's, which has been a place of worship for over 700 years, has another unusual headstone which was brought inside from the graveyard some years ago.

Now situated at the back of the pulpit, it bears no name simply a pair of sheep shears and a sword.

"It is thought to be the gravestone of a Pinxton sheep farmer who went to war and was killed in the fighting," said Stuart.

* An interesting slate headstone in the churchyard recalls a local mining tragedy.

Charles Braddow (42), who lived in an old cottage at Pinxton Toll Bar known as Pinxton Castle, was killed by a gas explosion in the old Green Engine pit at Pinxton on March 22, 1825.

His epitaph reads: "The wild fire proved my fatal destiny

Is the Charles Braddow, mentioned in the article Jerimiah's father,Elizabeth's husband and my wifes grandfather (x4)

I had no way of knowing this until I found a report of the disaster in the local paper

 


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