The Building of Crookes Cemetery Chapel - September 1908

From the Yorkshire Telegraph and Star dated 18th September 1908

The foundation stone of the Chapel in Crookes Cemetery - June 2016

Crookes Cemetery Chapel - Photograph taken May 2009

Sheffield Corporation paid 8,050 for the 23 acre site (which is the equivalent of 865,000 at today's prices). The first burial however took place three years earlier. The owner of the land was JOHN MAXFIELD was given special dispensation by Sheffield Corporation to be buried there

 

The Maxfield family grave in Crookes Cemetery  - Photograph taken May 2009

The Yorkshire Telegraph and Star dated 3rd May 1906 had this report on the funeral and interment

Sheffield Daily Independent dated Friday 4th May 1906 carried a report that John's funeral took place the previous day. The weather was "showery but mild"

Notes

MAXFIELD, Ellen Maud (Spinster, age 75). Died at 43 Northfield Avenue; Buried on February 17, 1940 in Unconsecrated ground;
Grave Number 3359, Section B of Crookes Cemetery, Sheffield. 

MAXFIELD, Emma (Widow, age 87). Died at 43 Northfield Avenue; Buried on May 27, 1922 in Unconsecrated ground;
Grave Number 3359, Section B of Crookes Cemetery, Sheffield.

MAXFIELD, John (Silversmith, age 74). Died at 142 Northfield Road; Buried on May 3, 1906 in Unconsecrated ground;
Grave Number 3359, Section B of Crookes Cemetery, Sheffield. Parent or Next of Kin if Available: ~. Remarks: Removed from Ecclesall Bierlow parish.

STANIFORTH, Alice Mary (Widow, age 63). Died at 43 Northfield Avenue; Buried on July 10, 1920 in Unconsecrated ground;
Grave Number 3359, Section B of Crookes Cemetery, Sheffield.

And the reason why the City Council were looking for a site

A letter by the Rev Martin vicar of Crookes is reported 11th October 1906 Sheffield Daily Independent. The letter was read out at the meeting of the Sheffield City Council

"Is there any possibility of the Crookes Cemetery being shortly ready for use. The need for it is growingly urgent. Crookes is very largely isolated by its position on the top and sides of a hill from any of the existing cemeteries which are available for burials from this neighbourhood. The churchyard is full and ought to be closed for burials. There have already been 3000 interments in its limited space. The funerals we have at present are chiefly children and the expense to poor parents (as so many young couples are) would be very considerably increased if they had to go to other burial places at a distance. If it would facilitate in anyway the use of the cemetery at an early date our Crookes church could be used for services until the cemetery chapel or chapels are built."

Cllr Marsden then explained that there were dwelling houses close to the western wall and a short time ago an interment was made in a grave within a couple of yards of one of the dwelling houses. The urgency of the matter would suggest itself to the Council on sanitary grounds alone.

Clearly the church had been overtaken by the growth of Crookes as a suburb of Sheffield, and neither it or the Council had made full and timely provision for the needs of its inhabitants. The fact that they were placing graves within a couple of yards of dwelling houses demonstrates the urgency of the situation

And even after the Cemetery was opened further controversy existed. This letter is from The Sheffield Daily Independent dated 31st July 1909 - the correspondent is rather unhappy to say the least!

 

As you can see the graves in the churchyard are perilously close to the adjacent housing - photo taken November 2015 

Sources

The Yorkshire Telegraph and Star dated 3rd May 1906

Sheffield Daily Independent dated Friday 4th May 1906

Sheffield Daily Independent 11th October 1906 

Yorkshire Telegraph and Star dated 18th September 1908

The Sheffield Daily Independent dated 31st July 1909

Sheffield Indexers

This page was last updated on 03/09/16 16:11

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